Child sponsorship is a family affair



  • August 12, 2017
April Stumme

Sports activities. Theater rehearsals. Cheerleading practice. Piano lessons.

Families with kids know that life can get busy fast.

Between doctor’s appointments, school programs, shopping for clothes, and more, daily schedules are packed with a flurry of events that keep parents and children on the go.

But this busyness often has an unintended negative effect — it tends to make us focus on ourselves.

It’s easy to forget that there’s a big world out there with big problems, a world in desperate need of Jesus. Even as Christians, we sometimes get our priorities out of order.

But there’s a way to help put life back into perspective: child sponsorship.

Suzie, a busy mom of four, says sponsorship has encouraged her family to focus on others. She has lined their home’s hallway with photos of their sponsored children. Now, when her family walks past, they are reminded of the hurting kids they’re helping on the other side of the world.

Sponsorship has been a huge blessing for Suzie’s family and something she hopes her kids will continue as they get older: “I think if a family introduces sponsorship into their house, they’re going to find that they … start to live for something other than just themselves.”

When you sponsor a child, you are impacting someone you may never meet. You’re choosing to Be the One to provide essentials such as food, clean water, and education to a child who otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford them. And you’re giving him or her the opportunity to learn about Jesus.

But you’re also making a difference closer to home. You’re giving your own children the chance to expand their worldview. You’re showing them what it looks like to have compassion and empathy for someone in need. And you’re demonstrating what it means to spread the Gospel to the world.

If you already sponsor, talk with your children about new ways to make them part of the sponsorship experience. And if you don’t sponsor yet, consider making sponsorship a part of your life today — not just for the sake of a child living far away, but also for the sake of your own children.