From the field | Using water to reverse poverty



  • March 08, 2017
Vernon Brewer

It’s been nearly two years since a massive earthquake devastated Nepal, killing more than 8,000 people and destroying countless villages. This week, I met some of the families affected by this tragedy.

Their lives were turned upside down in a matter of minutes. Their houses and businesses were demolished, and the town where their ancestors had lived for generations was simply gone.

They are still trying to recover.

These men and women now live in a resettlement village. They’ve slowly returned to work and to a normal routine. But it’s been difficult for them to build a sense of community.

The community always felt something was missing … until now.

This week we cut the ribbon on a new church building in this community — a place where families can come together, fellowship, and create a sense of belonging.

The church’s bright red roof stands out against the dull colors of the many construction sites around it — a symbol of hope and revival.

But many Nepali people are still waiting for help.

One of the greatest challenges to families trying to rebuild is the lack of clean water. When the earthquake struck, it destroyed more than 5,000 water sources and contaminated countless others.

Many schools and businesses have been reconstructed, but students struggle to return to class and adults miss work because of the hours spent collecting water from distant water sources.

The lack of clean water has left them trapped in devastating poverty … and they’re not alone. Men, women, and children around the world suffer from this same problem.

Collectively, women and girls across the globe spend 200 million hours each day collecting water. And half of the world’s hospital beds are filled with people suffering from water-related illnesses.

So what can you do?

You can relieve the burden for one of these girls. You can provide disease-free water to a sick individual so he can regain his health and return home to his family.

For just $15, you can make a difference. You can give someone the life-changing gift of clean water.

Giving clean water is the most powerful way you can help people break the chains of poverty.

To a person struggling to build a better life, clean water can be a symbol of hope for a brighter future.