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Get your family in the Christmas giving spirit



  • November 15, 2019
Kelsey Campbell
Kelsey Campbell

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There’s no greater excitement than awaiting Christmas Day! Kids (and many adults) anticipate it all year long.

And for the kids it’s all about the countdown to Christmas morning and what’s waiting for them under the tree. But instead of being eager about what they get, what if the kids in your life were most excited about what they could give … and how they can make a difference in the life of someone else?

Below are three Christmas activities you can do with your kids or grandkids. While completing them, you will learn about various gifts you can give from the World Help Christmas Giving catalog, how these gifts impact lives around the world, and why people living in poverty need your family’s help.

These activities are designed to build anticipation but also get your children thinking about how they can help someone they will never meet. You can download all of these resources by clicking here.

Advent calendar

Nothing builds excitement quite like a countdown to Christmas. And an advent calendar is a perfect way to celebrate each day in December up until the Big Day.

When you download your World Help Christmas Advent Calendar, you’ll be able to mark off the days one by one with your children — all while learning each day about a new way to make a difference for someone in need.

It’s a fun and easy opportunity to start a conversation with the children in your life about how many people around the world don’t have basic essentials like food or water … or how unexpected gifts like goats, chickens, and cows can help a family thrive.

Start by printing off and assembling your advent calendar. Then each day leading up to Christmas, peel back one flap to reveal a life-changing gift. Make sure you have your World Help Christmas Giving catalog handy! (If you don’t have one, you can request a copy here.) Each day has a corresponding page number you can turn to in the catalog to learn more about the gift of the day.

For example, when your child lifts the flap for Dec. 8, he or she will find a picture and quick fact about a sheep along with a page number. Have your child turn to that page number in the catalog, and you can read together about how sheep provide wool for the sweaters, milk for drinking, and cheese for cooking. Plus, your child can imagine how much fun it would be to have a sheep as a pet!

Another way to encourage generosity in your household is by using the advent calendar for gift ideas. On Dec. 24, when your kids will be anxiously peeking under the tree and wondering which presents are for them, take a moment to look over the entire advent calendar together.

After you review all 24 gifts, talk about which one you’d like to give as a family. You can always give in honor of a family member or loved one. But make sure your family knows that any gift they choose will go on to provide amazing benefits for a person in need.

Scavenger hunt

Do you know how many eggs a chicken can lay each year? Or just how many people a digital copy of the Bible can impact? What item of clothing are most children required to have if they want to attend school in many countries?

You’ll learn the answer to all of these questions and more when your family takes part in the World Help Christmas Giving scavenger hunt.

Here’s how it works:

1. Download the scavenger hunt worksheet and read the questions together as a family.

2. Pull out your print copy of the catalog or look online at christmasgiving.org.

3. Search for your answers. Bonus points if you do this while drinking hot cocoa and listening to Christmas music!

Want to make it a little more competitive? Print out a separate worksheet for each member of your family and race to see who can finish first!

Coloring page

This coloring page is another activity you can use to spend quality time with your children or grandchildren.

Coloring the beautiful Christmas tree will get them excited for the holiday. While you are coloring together, you can take the opportunity to talk about how much you have to be thankful for. Explain that although there may be numerous gifts under our trees this time of year, there are people who don’t have basic essentials like medicine, food, or even a Bible to read.

By pointing out the needs of others and encouraging your kids or grandkids to help, you can inspire them to grow up to be devoted humanitarians — just like you!

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