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How kids around the world are spending this summer



  • July 30, 2020
Kelsey Campbell
Kelsey Campbell

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For the first time in probably forever, kids all around the globe are out of school at the same time.

Although June, July, and August are the typical out-of-school summer months for boys and girls here in the U.S., that’s not the case for many kids in different countries.

After all, in the Southern Hemisphere, it’s not even summer. In Brazil, for example, the hottest months of the year are December and January, so that’s when students typically get their long summer break from school.

Here are a few more examples of school breaks around the world that might surprise you:

• Thailand: Kids typically take a break from classes from March to May

• India: Boys and girls get off the month of April and part of June

• Peru: Schools are closed from January through March

• Philippines: The summer break falls from April to May

• Uganda: Students get three breaks — one in May, one in September, and all of December and January

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, though, classes are out in nearly every country right now.

These are tough times, and kids miss being with their school friends. But they’re also making the most of the time off.

We asked sponsored children around the globe what they have been up to during the break this summer. Here’s what they said:

Playing outside

“What I am looking forward to most this summer is riding bikes, swinging, going down the slide, and eating a lot of dessert.”

— Kaylie, Mexico 

No matter where you are around the world, children love spending time outdoors and playing sports. Soccer is always a favorite. Whether school is in session or not, kids in Uganda, Nepal, the Philippines, Honduras, and many other countries can often be found kicking around a soccer ball. Several kids also mentioned they like to play dodgeball and basketball with their siblings and neighbors.

And I’m sure your kids or grandkids would agree that summer break isn’t complete without spending some time in the water. In Mexico and the Philippines, children like to go to the beach and swim in the ocean. Boys and girls who don’t live as close to the coast will often splash around in local lakes or rivers.

Using their imaginations

For girls, they like pretending to be mums, dads, and children while cooking [pretend] food. The ones from Christian backgrounds sometimes pretend to be pastors as the other children listen. We call it ‘church game.’”

Innocent, Uganda

A break from school is the perfect opportunity for a child to use his or her imagination. Whether it’s reading books or playing games of pretend, children love to travel to other places in their minds when they’re forced to stay in one place.

In addition to dreaming up big ideas and stories, kids love to physically create new things, as well. Many of the kids in the sponsorship program love drawing and making crafts. Two boys in the Philippines, Mark and John, said they like to take their creativity to the next level by building “forts” from branches, rocks, and other objects they find near the river. Then, they pretend to camp out and cook frogs and fish.

Helping others

“I’m spending my time mostly helping my parents, washing clothes, reading books, and watching television.”

Henry, India

Many children in the child sponsorship program live in boarding homes during the school year. When they go home during the break, it’s an opportunity for them to help their parents around the house. Just like your own kids or grandkids, these boys and girls have chores to do. They may be responsible for collecting water, cooking, cleaning, or helping in the garden.

Normally, Uganda’s summer break falls during the rainy season when the mangos are perfectly ripe and ready to harvest. The kids love climbing the trees to collect them, and they sometimes even compete to see who can pick the most!

Gardening has also kept kids busy during this unexpected break because of the coronavirus. In India, the few children who remain at one boarding school have spent their time planting pumpkins, beans, corn, and other vegetables. It’s been fun for them to watch the plants grow over the months when they’ve been social distancing on campus.

Waiting to go back to school

“I am thankful to go to school and that we are all healthy here. You can pray for my studies, for my siblings, and my health.” 

— Esmeralda, Mexico

It may surprise you since many kids in the U.S. dread the end of summer, but several sponsored kids mentioned that they are excited to get back to classes soon.

Boys and girls living developing countries understand that a good education is one of the best tools they can have in the fight against poverty.  

That’s why they are so grateful for sponsorship which provides them with essentials like educational assistance, school uniforms, and school supplies as well as nutritious food, medical care, and more.

Unfortunately, though, there are still many children who don’t have sponsors. They don’t have the chance to go to a good school, receive healthy meals, or dream of a life outside of poverty. Without help, they’ll most likely never reach their full potential. Not to mention, their needs are even greater in the midst of this pandemic.

Today, you can help rescue a child who is without a sponsor. Your one-time gift will cover his or her most urgent needs for three critical months. And as a special thank you, we’ll even text you a photo of the child you are helping.

You can help make sure that when this summer comes to a close and kids around the world head back to school, one boy or girl will be on the path to a better life!

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